Wimbledon, the most prestigious Grand Slam tournament and also the oldest tennis tournament in the world with 141 years of age.

Born in 1877, Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam tournament on the pitch. Previously, on the field, there was an Australian Open, but due to the difficult climate to maintain the grass during the tournament, since 1988, Australia has moved to play on hard courts.

Major Walter Clopton Wingfield was the one who gave birth to tennis in 1875, which he initially called it a very memorable Sphairistike name. Walter quickly popularized this subject and racket players were the most eager to participate in training.

Wimbledon quickly got their first tournament just 2 years after it was invented. The first year finals had about 200 spectators to witness. By 1937, Wimbledon’s charisma surpassed many other sports to dominate and that was the year these five tennis tournaments were broadcast live across the UK.

In 1924, Wimbledon introduced a competitive seed arrangement system, which has been maintained ever since. Accordingly, 128 players will participate in the men’s singles, 128 women’s singles, 64 men’s doubles, 64 women’s doubles, and 48 doubles will compete in the mixed doubles.

Wimbledon has 19 stadiums in total. In particular, the No. 2 arena is known as the Place to bury the seeds. Many of the top seeds in the tournament have been dropped on this stage.

Despite its early birth, Wimbledon didn’t open the door until 1968. It was this open era that marked the overthrow of the UK players by names from neighboring Europe. It was not until 2013 that Andy Murray made the United Kingdom open his eyes when he won the Wimbledon championship and became the first UK player to be crowned since opening.

There are 3 players and 7 times crowned Wimbledon men’s singles: William Renshaw, Peter Sampras and Roger Federer. In the women’s event, Czech tennis player Martina Navratilova has won 9 times. Navratilova is also a great female tennis player, winning 18 Grand Slam singles, 31 Grand Slam doubles women. She was second only to Steffi Graf, the German tennis player and also the greatest player of the 20th century with 22 Grand Slams in her career.